The Kick Serve is a serve that you want to be able to execute in your tennis matches. Learn these simple and specific steps to be able to execute a kick serve well under pressure and in second serve situations.

This is one of the MAJOR skills that WILL most definitely distinguish you from your opponents on the court, especially if they haven’t learned the kick serve yet themselves and it WILL drastically change your results forever.

Mastering the “Kick Serve” is an advanced technique that seasoned players and all professionals use to keep their opponents at bay and on the defensive.

If you have heard the term, “You’re only as good as your second serveby using heavy spin and arc for safety and height over the net and at the same time “kicking” the ball up high after the bounce, it makes a very difficult return for your opponents.


The Kick Serve

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The Kick Serve

continental gripTHE GRIP: The grip for the kick serve should be the Continental grip, just like all serves that you hit. This allows the racquet face to be open, which will also allow you easier access to the brushing motion needed as you swing through the contact point and create the spin needed to create the kick on the ball. If you want to open the racquet face, even more, you can rotate the grip even more, so that when your index knuckle would end up on the top bevel, with your palm facing upwards, it would be kind of like holding a frying pan. This modified grip will allow you to create even more spin on your serve by making a flush contact with the ball MORE difficult and at the same time make the strings more available for the brushing technique that is needed for the spin on the kick serve.

 

 

the tennis serveTHE STANCE AND FOOTWORK:  Your stance is going to be very similar to the traditional stance you use when serving. The front or dominant foot should be at about 45 degrees and pointing toward the right net post for right handers and the left net post for left-handers. The feet should be shoulder width apart and you should have a slight bend in the knees when attempting the kick serve, you are going to need spring from your legs to get the maximum amount of spin on this serve.

 

 

 

kick serveTHE STROKE: The swing path for the kick serve should stay about the same as your traditional flat serve, nice and loose with fluid movement all the way through. One key difference in the kick serve is the ball toss, you will want to focus on getting the toss back over your head a little bit more. If the normal 1st serve toss is at 1 o’clock and about in line with your dominant swinging shoulder, then the kick serve toss would be more toward 12 o’clock or even 11 o’clock. You can see in the picture to the left how the back is arching slightly and the ball toss is at about 12 o’clock. This enables you to swing from left to right or right to left and brush up and across the ball creating a diagonal side-spin of sorts. Once this spin has been effectively applied and the ball lands in the service box, the spin will cause it to jump up and out of the court causing difficulties for your opponents.

 

kick serveFOLLOW-THROUGH AND RECOVERY: The follow through is a natural part of the serve as you release the racket from the contact point in a downward motion toward the target. The racket swings past your left leg (for a right hander). Your momentum should carry you inside the court as you land on your left foot as a result of pushing your body upward to reach the contact point with the ball. The kick serve is usually used as a second serve, but you can use it effectively as a first serve as well, plus you can get more practice on creating a powerful kick serve if you hit it on both the first and second serves during some of your service games!

The follow through is a natural part of the serve as you release the racket from the contact point in a downward motion toward the target. The racket swings past your left leg (for a right hander). Your momentum should carry you inside the court as you land on your left foot as a result of thrusting upward to reach contact point.

– See more at: http://www.elitetennistraining.com/the-serve/#sthash.pF4cLrhI.dpuf

The follow through is a natural part of the serve as you release the racket from the contact point in a downward motion toward the target. The racket swings past your left leg (for a right hander). Your momentum should carry you inside the court as you land on your left foot as a result of thrusting upward to reach contact point.

– See more at: http://www.elitetennistraining.com/the-serve/#sthash.pF4cLrhI.d